The Third Shift


  1. Raider sadness is the best sadness.

    Raider sadness is the best sadness.

  2. GPOYW, New Favorite Hoodie Edition.

    GPOYW, New Favorite Hoodie Edition.

  3. Philip Rivers’ second half of FAIL, encompassed by a failure to catch his own mouthguard.

    (via cjzero)

  4. TIM TEBOW TRADED TO THE JETS.

    1. I’m looking forward to Kissing Suzy Kolber’s first piece about Tebow in the Jets’ locker room.
    2. OH MY GOD TEBOW IN THE NYC MEDIA MARKET. BWAHAHAHAHA. He’ll get eaten alive.
    3. Fuck you, Josh McDaniels — a 4th and a 6th for a failure of a first round pick.
    4. John Elway for NFL Executive of the Year. Who else could pull off a signing that would have the whipped-up Tebow frenzy subside enough to be able to trade him. He is Teflon right now.
  5. Yeah, I’m pretty sure I’ll be watching even though I shouldn’t be.

    Yeah, I’m pretty sure I’ll be watching even though I shouldn’t be.

    (via nfloffseason)

  6. ☛ The Year of Magical Stinking: An Oral History of Tebow Time - GQ

    The headline alone is fantastic. Brady Quinn is catching serious flak for his comments and defending them by saying they were old and don’t reflect where he is now, but the problem is that they seem relatively accurate. The problem is that we don’t know whether Tim Tebow will actually be anything legit as an NFL quarterback until next season, when everyone’s had time to review the tape and he’s had a full off-season and training camp.

    But Terrell Suggs isn’t wrong to wonder where the appreciation was for Cam Newton on a mass level, because a casual observer would have been forgiven for thinking Tebow actually had better numbers. Tebow, right now, is the beneficiary of an adoring public, a coaching staff willing to create an offensive philosophy around him, and a very good defense that broke down in the secondary.

    The 2012 season is where Tebow will make or break his career, and he probably knows that and relishes it more than anyone.

  7. ☛ Jeremy Lin! Why the Knicks' New Star Is Not the New Tebow | The Nation

    Dave Zirin lays out the points in a much more, well, readable form than I did.

  8. nfloffseason:

“Three days before the draft, McDaniels had gone to Gainesville, telling no one, because he wanted to work out Tebow and talk football with him, to see how much he knew about offensive football — and to see if he might be worth a major investment of draft choices if that’s what it came down to get him.
“We spent about seven hours together,” McDaniels said. “Our offense is pretty complicated, and the terminology and the scheme is totally different from what he did at Florida. But about midway through my time there, we’re going through plays, and he starts using our terminology. He’s so smart about football that he was able to begin to speak my language and talk apples to apples. He’d already translated what he knew of our scheme into my words. There’re going to be doubts about him. Great doubts — and I understand that. Some people don’t think he has the natural traits of a great quarterback. Here’s what I think: Do Jim Furyk and Tiger Woods swing the club the same way, hit irons the same way? No. But they both win tournaments. There’s different ways to throw, different mechanics, and you can still get the job done.”
At the end of the conversation, McDaniels said he couldn’t wait to see Tebow throw the ball deep to Thomas. “He’s 6-foot-3, and a legit 4.3-second [in the 40-yard dash] guy. What a weapon he’s going to be. Wait ‘til our fans see these guys together.”
They did Sunday, in one of the greatest games the city’s ever hosted. Now, it’s clear that offensive coordinator Mike McCoy, who has been important in Tebow’s development and has been a very smart play-caller and strategist, deserves a huge hand for his work this year. John Fox has been a smart head coach, because he has adjusted to Tebow’s style rather than forcing him to the play a straight pro style. But after what we witnessed on draft day 20 months ago, and the magic we saw Sunday, one question: Still hate Josh McDaniels, Denver?”
- Peter King

Short answer: Yes.
Longer answer: It’s more like I hate Pat Bowlen, because there was nothing wrong with the offense as presented that Mike Shanahan wasn’t able to get into the playoffs — Cutler to Marshall and Royal wasn’t a problem. The issue is and always had been defense — which Shanahan couldn’t draft for nor could he keep a decent coordinator for. Bowlen should have done two things at that point: hire a traditional general manager with real power, and then hire a defensive-minded coach (I wanted Rex Ryan) to fix what was broken. Instead, he handed all power to an untested offensive coordinator who couldn’t draft defense and alienated the crucial pieces in a system that was working. McDaniels’ arrogance in dealing with Cutler did not help matters, although Cutler was a brat — and his defensive drafting was just as poor as Shanahan’s, trading up to draft a safety in the 2nd round that didn’t even make the final roster and was dealt away! Dumervil will pan out, Robert Ayers might, but John Fox has to rebuild a defense. As an organizational whole, all that does not make up for the tragic mess that was McDaniels’ two seasons in Denver, and only God knows if Tim Tebow will ever throw a routine pass between 8-15 yards on time with the accuracy most NFL quarterbacks ever will. If he can’t (and there’s no excuse for him not to, because other so-called “running” or “option” QBs in college can, Cam Newton being the latest example), then Elway and Fox have to spend a first or second round pick on a quarterback and start again there.
Essentially, Peter King can blow it out his ass. Just because Tebow won a playoff game and did a fine job doing it doesn’t mean we’re content with his body of work as a starter to this point. I want him to succeed because that means the team does and does not have to use a draft pick to groom a starting QB. I think the lockout was the worst thing to happen to him as far as developing into an NFL QB; it denied him crucial practice reps and time. No matter how far the Broncos go short of a Super Bowl appearance, those questions need to be answered about Tebow. The best part of it is that Tim Tebow, like any other athlete with a fiercely competitive streak, wants to put the work in to answer those questions.

    nfloffseason:

    “Three days before the draft, McDaniels had gone to Gainesville, telling no one, because he wanted to work out Tebow and talk football with him, to see how much he knew about offensive football — and to see if he might be worth a major investment of draft choices if that’s what it came down to get him.

    “We spent about seven hours together,” McDaniels said. “Our offense is pretty complicated, and the terminology and the scheme is totally different from what he did at Florida. But about midway through my time there, we’re going through plays, and he starts using our terminology. He’s so smart about football that he was able to begin to speak my language and talk apples to apples. He’d already translated what he knew of our scheme into my words. There’re going to be doubts about him. Great doubts — and I understand that. Some people don’t think he has the natural traits of a great quarterback. Here’s what I think: Do Jim Furyk and Tiger Woods swing the club the same way, hit irons the same way? No. But they both win tournaments. There’s different ways to throw, different mechanics, and you can still get the job done.”

    At the end of the conversation, McDaniels said he couldn’t wait to see Tebow throw the ball deep to Thomas. “He’s 6-foot-3, and a legit 4.3-second [in the 40-yard dash] guy. What a weapon he’s going to be. Wait ‘til our fans see these guys together.”

    They did Sunday, in one of the greatest games the city’s ever hosted. Now, it’s clear that offensive coordinator Mike McCoy, who has been important in Tebow’s development and has been a very smart play-caller and strategist, deserves a huge hand for his work this year. John Fox has been a smart head coach, because he has adjusted to Tebow’s style rather than forcing him to the play a straight pro style. But after what we witnessed on draft day 20 months ago, and the magic we saw Sunday, one question: Still hate Josh McDaniels, Denver?”

    - Peter King

    Short answer: Yes.

    Longer answer: It’s more like I hate Pat Bowlen, because there was nothing wrong with the offense as presented that Mike Shanahan wasn’t able to get into the playoffs — Cutler to Marshall and Royal wasn’t a problem. The issue is and always had been defense — which Shanahan couldn’t draft for nor could he keep a decent coordinator for. Bowlen should have done two things at that point: hire a traditional general manager with real power, and then hire a defensive-minded coach (I wanted Rex Ryan) to fix what was broken. Instead, he handed all power to an untested offensive coordinator who couldn’t draft defense and alienated the crucial pieces in a system that was working. McDaniels’ arrogance in dealing with Cutler did not help matters, although Cutler was a brat — and his defensive drafting was just as poor as Shanahan’s, trading up to draft a safety in the 2nd round that didn’t even make the final roster and was dealt away! Dumervil will pan out, Robert Ayers might, but John Fox has to rebuild a defense. As an organizational whole, all that does not make up for the tragic mess that was McDaniels’ two seasons in Denver, and only God knows if Tim Tebow will ever throw a routine pass between 8-15 yards on time with the accuracy most NFL quarterbacks ever will. If he can’t (and there’s no excuse for him not to, because other so-called “running” or “option” QBs in college can, Cam Newton being the latest example), then Elway and Fox have to spend a first or second round pick on a quarterback and start again there.

    Essentially, Peter King can blow it out his ass. Just because Tebow won a playoff game and did a fine job doing it doesn’t mean we’re content with his body of work as a starter to this point. I want him to succeed because that means the team does and does not have to use a draft pick to groom a starting QB. I think the lockout was the worst thing to happen to him as far as developing into an NFL QB; it denied him crucial practice reps and time. No matter how far the Broncos go short of a Super Bowl appearance, those questions need to be answered about Tebow. The best part of it is that Tim Tebow, like any other athlete with a fiercely competitive streak, wants to put the work in to answer those questions.

    (via nfloffseason)

  9. A crazy ending to a crazy game. Tim Tebow threw for 316 yards on less than 50% accuracy (again!), yet nailed several bombs when necessary, including this one at the end. Can’t forget how awesome Demaryius Thomas was — never mind the game-winning score here, dude was all over the field when Eric Decker went down.

    The confusing thing is how the Steelers looked out of sorts from the get-go on defense. It showed on the OT winner: there are 8, 9 players in the box for the run while leaving Thomas in single coverage.

    On to Foxboro!

    Tim Tebow Game Winning Pass vs Steelers (HD) (by phillies1801)

  10. Tim Tebow is the messiah for the sports-is-not-really-about-sports crowd. It’s harder to turn Cam Newton into a metaphor—unless you’re determined to keep fucking this particular chicken—so he’ll remain buried under all the Tebow talk for a while. But where Tebow is the kind of player who has been phased out of the modern NFL, a throwback, Cam is a kind we’ve never seen before, a look at where we’re going, not where we’ve been. Which one would you rather watch?

    Deadspin’s Jack Dickey nails the matter. (The “fucking this particular chicken” refers to the pay-for-play bit involving Newton’s father.)

    Cam Newton > Tim Tebow [Cam Newton]

  11. For someone who chronicled a lot of writing and “analysis” that had no basis in reality at Fire Joe Morgan, Michael Schur seems a bit surprised at how football analysts — mostly former players and coaches — continue to be prostrate before Tim Tebow despite his being responsible for one of the crucial three turnovers in today’s loss at home to the New England Patriots. FJM dealt more in baseball but the idea of Tebow as practiced by analysts, columnists, and pundits in the sporting industry is certainly akin to the old saws the baseball folks dug out for David Eckstein — only it’s on a much larger level because QB is the NFL’s glamour position.
The worst thing about this whole Tebow business is that it doesn’t seem like he, as the object of their affection, is doing anything completely different or being anything other than what he is. Every quote he gives, save the talk about God and Jesus, is out of the lessons Crash Davis gave Nuke LaLoosh in Bull Durham. That makes him very difficult to dislike even if you don’t agree with his faith or how he expresses it. He seems like a fundamentally decent human being, which probably doesn’t separate him from a lot of everyday players in the NFL, but his polite charisma drives a lot of otherwise reasonable and smart people to ignore his flaws at his profession and pump up virtues that he does have and others that fit a narrative, regardless of whether Tebow really has those characteristics or not.
What’s really kind of sad about it is that Tim Tebow is probably 100x more fascinating as a person and a case study of how college football and the NFL clash than the caricature we’re given.

    For someone who chronicled a lot of writing and “analysis” that had no basis in reality at Fire Joe Morgan, Michael Schur seems a bit surprised at how football analysts — mostly former players and coaches — continue to be prostrate before Tim Tebow despite his being responsible for one of the crucial three turnovers in today’s loss at home to the New England Patriots. FJM dealt more in baseball but the idea of Tebow as practiced by analysts, columnists, and pundits in the sporting industry is certainly akin to the old saws the baseball folks dug out for David Eckstein — only it’s on a much larger level because QB is the NFL’s glamour position.

    The worst thing about this whole Tebow business is that it doesn’t seem like he, as the object of their affection, is doing anything completely different or being anything other than what he is. Every quote he gives, save the talk about God and Jesus, is out of the lessons Crash Davis gave Nuke LaLoosh in Bull Durham. That makes him very difficult to dislike even if you don’t agree with his faith or how he expresses it. He seems like a fundamentally decent human being, which probably doesn’t separate him from a lot of everyday players in the NFL, but his polite charisma drives a lot of otherwise reasonable and smart people to ignore his flaws at his profession and pump up virtues that he does have and others that fit a narrative, regardless of whether Tebow really has those characteristics or not.

    What’s really kind of sad about it is that Tim Tebow is probably 100x more fascinating as a person and a case study of how college football and the NFL clash than the caricature we’re given.

  12. ☛ Tim Tebow’s Success Inspiring Other Teams To Start Shitty Quarterbacks | The Onion Sports Network

    No further comment required.

  13. Tim Tebow: Magical White Person

    classicaldotorg:

    through_my_eyes_by_jamin95-d3lhwdq

    By Mobutu Sese Seko

    Even if one wants to feel a genial non-interfering positivity or salutary indifference toward Tim Tebow and his “testimony,” the frequency and intensity with which it’s invoked by NFL Network and ESPN makes it intolerable. By week 14, Skip Bayless will be berating some poor Archbishop about their “beatification bias.”

    This really isn’t Tebow’s fault. He’s said the right things, and provided a few crude but undeniably dramatic end-of-game moments. But he keeps getting cajoled into testifying, and his faith is the kind that leads him to relate the same story about his performance over and over with a kind of guileless sincerity. It might make you a little sick to your stomach because the media keeps re-administering the dose, but it itself isn’t toxic.

    It is a little dumb, however. Last night, Rich Eisen dismissed Tebow’s replacement-level
    9/20 completions for 104 yards, saying, “We’ve reached the point where we should stop mentioning [Tebow’s] stat line.” This wasn’t for any great repetition of the facts; instead, the NFL Network seemed positively allergic to discussing Tebow within the parameters of his actual job.

    Read More

    I hope Tim Tebow turns out to be a decent quarterback because I don’t want the team I root for to have to spend another first-round pick on a passer for the second time in three years, but that doesn’t mean we have to be entirely ignorant of his obvious flaws or excuse them because “he just wins” and he has “all the intangibles that make him a leader.” Those things may be true, but your intangibles are only as good as your last winning streak — and it’s disturbing to observe how quickly observers are falling all over him, as if he has come to save them from their own (necessary) cynicism.

    This is merely endemic of the entire athlete building up/tearing down narrative complex used for years. When better teams (see Chicago, New England, and maybe even Minnesota in two weeks) put in a full 60 minutes, you’re going to see more of what the Lions did. Miami’s Wildcat experiment “revolution” lasted less than a full season before people figured it out, and by that point, the Dolphins had wasted a second round pick on WVU’s Pat White in trying to expand that Wildcat formation. The NFL is really good at adjusting to and adapting spread and option principles because these are smart coaches, and the league is a copycat one.  What will really be telling is when the Tebow-led Broncos have their first serious losing streak — and it will happen, because we’re talking NFL and these things happen to teams.

    Will anyone talk about ignoring his statistics and the basic elements of his job then?

  14. fucking hell. all of this makes me want hiim to fall on his ass so the Broncos are bad enough to have to draft Andrew Luck. I cannot believe I’m rooting for my rooting interest to suck.

    fucking hell. all of this makes me want hiim to fall on his ass so the Broncos are bad enough to have to draft Andrew Luck. I cannot believe I’m rooting for my rooting interest to suck.

  15. ☛ William C. Rhoden: Time for Tebow - NYTimes.com

    It’s stunning to see Bill Rhoden be so flat out wrong. The real problem with the Broncos is their defense. Quarterbacks don’t help, but if you’ve watched even an iota of Tebow’s mechanisms and footwork in real, live NFL game play, it does not particularly inspire confidence, and that’s not even the biggest part. In his starts last season, what I saw of Tebow involved missing a lot of the simple reads and just running for it instead. If there had been a normal training camp and offseason, I’d be all for Tebow at this point because there would have been time through OTAs and camp to see if those things could be fixed. The lockout ensured that this wasn’t the case.