It astounds me that Google took the easy way out and didn’t make a version of the phone for LTE networks. No one likes the fact that the carriers (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, & T-Mobile) really hold the power in the U.S. cell phone market, but you can’t just ignore the reality for a high-end phone.
Essentially Google & LG should have taken a cue from Samsung; make versions that work for each carrier and then sell their own unlocked versions. This is rather disheartening. Fortunately, I buy phones every two years — and thus I’m waiting for the next edition of the Nexus.
(via Google Nexus 4 review | The Verge)

It astounds me that Google took the easy way out and didn’t make a version of the phone for LTE networks. No one likes the fact that the carriers (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, & T-Mobile) really hold the power in the U.S. cell phone market, but you can’t just ignore the reality for a high-end phone.

Essentially Google & LG should have taken a cue from Samsung; make versions that work for each carrier and then sell their own unlocked versions. This is rather disheartening. Fortunately, I buy phones every two years — and thus I’m waiting for the next edition of the Nexus.

(via Google Nexus 4 review | The Verge)

I mean, it’s a Nexus so it fascinates me, but I’m not breaking contract for a phone with a max of 16 GB storage and no micro-SD slot. I’ve not owned my current phone for a year yet. There will be another Nexus before I need a new phone. However, the wireless charging orb is freaking awesome.
(via The Nexus 4: Google’s flagship phone lands November 13th for $299 | The Verge)

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The Third Shift A vagabond who's made his home in the Pacific Northwest.

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