Irony and cognitive dissonance will not die anytime soon, despite media declarations to the contrary.

However, a remake of Red Dawn, post-Afghanistan-and-Iraq, is at least bearing the pair up for lunch money and giving them swirlies. I mean, a movie where Americans are talking about defending their homeland and the invaders (North Korean or Chinese, doesn’t matter) only see it as a “place” that will actually be taken seriously by many of my fellow citizens had to be someone’s idea of an overly elaborate joke.

At some point there’s too much money involved for it to be pure trolling.

So, remember Sean Young as Rachael in Blade Runner? My girlfriend decided on that as a costume last night. Trust me when I say it was fantastic.
(No, I’m not going to share the actual photo I took. This pic from the movie will have to do.)

So, remember Sean Young as Rachael in Blade Runner? My girlfriend decided on that as a costume last night. Trust me when I say it was fantastic.

(No, I’m not going to share the actual photo I took. This pic from the movie will have to do.)

So the line Obama dropped tonight? “I’m no longer just a candidate. I’m the President.” 

Reminded me a lot of the big speech Michael Douglas made at a White House presser in The American President, which concludes with “My name is Andrew Shepherd, and I AM the President.” (It’s a reference/rebuke to Richard Dreyfus’ Republican senator, who’s the likely opponent in the fall, who ends his speeches with: “I’m Bob Rumson, and I’m running for President!”) So much so I wondered if someone slipped Aaron Sorkin a draft of the speech to re-write.

If you excise the stuff he goes on about Annette Benning’s Sydney Ellen Wade, just substitute Mitt Romney for Bob Rumson and it’s pretty much the tone Obama used tonight — talking about the divisions the GOP want to exploit, how they’re not offering solutions so much as selling you on some nostalgia. That said, hearing a fictional Democratic president talk about gun control and banning assault weapons really tells you it’s the 1990s, cos no one dares do that any more.

richardrushfield:

RIP TONY SCOTT

The coolest opening sequence probably ever. From The Hunger (1983).

Terribly sad news to hear. 

this is badass. My personal favorite Scott film remains “True Romance,” although I’ll watch “Top Gun”, “The Last Boy Scout”, and “The Hunger” any time.

The (500) Days of Summer attitude of “He wants you so bad” seems attractive to some women and men, especially younger ones, but I would encourage anyone who has a crush on my character to watch it again and examine how selfish he is. He develops a mildly delusional obsession over a girl onto whom he projects all these fantasies. He thinks she’ll give his life meaning because he doesn’t care about much else going on in his life. A lot of boys and girls think their lives will have meaning if they find a partner who wants nothing else in life but them. That’s not healthy. That’s falling in love with the idea of a person, not the actual person.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt, in the latest edition of Playboy’s “20 Questions” (link NSFW b/c it’s Playboy)

(500) Days of Summer, despite how annoying Zooey Deschanel was/is/can be on screen, was a textbook case of the Unreliable Narrator.

richardrushfield:

IPAD: BRINGING A GUN TO THE TEXTING DURING A MOVIE KNIFEFIGHT
As I’ve noted before, nothing brings me more pleasure in life than getting people (particularly young people) thrown out of movie theaters for texting or talking during a film.  As I’ve mentioned, people who do these things are human mildew and the only solution for them is to scrape them off of any surfact they attach themselves to.  I only wish that we lived in a society where justice still prevailed and far more severe punishments were available than just throwing them out of the theater.  The removal of their thumbs would be an excellent place to start.
But if there is a downside to getting people thrown out of movies for texting it is that the process of doing so often causes you yourself to miss a good 10 - 15 minutes of the film. A sacrifice that must be made for the public good, but not a win/win by any means.
Last night however, I came upon a more efficient, if slightly less satisfying way of dealing with this menace.  I was watching a movie and when the gentleman next to me started texting.  He was not particularly young and looked like he belonged much more in a nightclub than a movie theater.  I object to the enormous role the word “douche” now plays in our language, and yet, in this instance, I can find no fitting substitute so I will let the D word stand as an apt description.  Anyhow, the hour was late.  The movie was so bad (more about that to come) that most of my will to fight had been bludgeoned out of me.  Talking to this cretin to even tell him to knock it off would have taken more than I had to give.   But then I realized I had in my hands a bigger weapon than his pathetic little iPhone.  When the iPad was first unveiled, they were mocked as just giant iPhones, but perhaps they were built to be such with this very moment in mind.   Not saying a word, I turned my iPad on, opened the browser to a white screen and positioned it on my lap pointed directly at my neighbor’s face and away from mine.  Thus, I was able to continue to enjoy (or not) the movie - with the screen pointed away from me - ignoring him while he glared at me in outrage and waved his hands around in protest.  Finally as he seemed about to make a stink, it dawned on him that he was not in a position to complain about people having their screens open during the movie.  I saw him visibly deflate and put his phone back in his pocket.  Without a word, I then turned my iPad off and put it away.
Again, not as satisfying as getting him thrown out or having his thumbs cut off, but very effective and made the point!

I applaud this passive-aggressive approach, because God only knows why you would pay $7.50 (at the very least) to see a movie yet spend time on your phone while doing it.

richardrushfield:

IPAD: BRINGING A GUN TO THE TEXTING DURING A MOVIE KNIFEFIGHT


As I’ve noted before, nothing brings me more pleasure in life than getting people (particularly young people) thrown out of movie theaters for texting or talking during a film.  As I’ve mentioned, people who do these things are human mildew and the only solution for them is to scrape them off of any surfact they attach themselves to.  I only wish that we lived in a society where justice still prevailed and far more severe punishments were available than just throwing them out of the theater.  The removal of their thumbs would be an excellent place to start.

But if there is a downside to getting people thrown out of movies for texting it is that the process of doing so often causes you yourself to miss a good 10 - 15 minutes of the film. A sacrifice that must be made for the public good, but not a win/win by any means.

Last night however, I came upon a more efficient, if slightly less satisfying way of dealing with this menace.  I was watching a movie and when the gentleman next to me started texting.  He was not particularly young and looked like he belonged much more in a nightclub than a movie theater.  I object to the enormous role the word “douche” now plays in our language, and yet, in this instance, I can find no fitting substitute so I will let the D word stand as an apt description.  

Anyhow, the hour was late.  The movie was so bad (more about that to come) that most of my will to fight had been bludgeoned out of me.  Talking to this cretin to even tell him to knock it off would have taken more than I had to give.   

But then I realized I had in my hands a bigger weapon than his pathetic little iPhone.  When the iPad was first unveiled, they were mocked as just giant iPhones, but perhaps they were built to be such with this very moment in mind.   Not saying a word, I turned my iPad on, opened the browser to a white screen and positioned it on my lap pointed directly at my neighbor’s face and away from mine.  Thus, I was able to continue to enjoy (or not) the movie - with the screen pointed away from me - ignoring him while he glared at me in outrage and waved his hands around in protest.  Finally as he seemed about to make a stink, it dawned on him that he was not in a position to complain about people having their screens open during the movie.  I saw him visibly deflate and put his phone back in his pocket.  Without a word, I then turned my iPad off and put it away.

Again, not as satisfying as getting him thrown out or having his thumbs cut off, but very effective and made the point!

I applaud this passive-aggressive approach, because God only knows why you would pay $7.50 (at the very least) to see a movie yet spend time on your phone while doing it.

You began, spectacularly enough, with the excellent “Bottle Rocket”, a film we consider to be your finest work to date. No doubt others would agree that the striking originality of your premise and vision was most effective in this seminal work. Subsequent films - “Rushmore”, “The Royal Tenenbaums”, “The Life Aquatic” - have been good fun but somewhat disappointing - perhaps increasingly so. These follow-ups have all concerned themselves with the theme we like to call “the enervated family of origin”©, from which springs diverse subplots also largely concerned with the failure to fulfill early promise. Again, each film increasingly relies on eccentric visual detail, period wardrobe, idiosyncratic and overwrought set design, and music supervision that leans heavily on somewhat obscure 60’s “British Invasion” tracks a-jangle with twelve-string guitars, harpsichords and mandolins. The company of players, while excellent, retains pretty much the same tone and function from film to film. Indeed, you must be aware that your career as an auteur is mirrored in the lives of your beloved characters as they struggle in vain to duplicate early glories.

Remember when Steely Dan wrote Wes Anderson a letter and it was glorious? I forgot that Steely Dan and I are totally on the same page when it comes to Wes Anderson preferences. They are also extremely astute writers, particularly on the topic of film. (via elisabethdonnelly)

Host Seth Rogen Kicks of the 2012 Spirit Awards (by filmindependent)

Seth Rogen for 2013 Academy Awards host, especially if Chris Rock isn’t available. Rock would be first choice, but get someone who’s had to be funny in at least the past decade.

shirtoid:

We Can’t Stop Here by Jimiyo is $10 today only (2/20) at TeeFury

the best touch in that movie that even I didn’t notice right off the bat and still marvel about more than a year later.

inothernews:

Still can’t get over how awesome Inception is.

Script, special effects, and such aside, my favorite touch in that movie is using an Edith Piaf song (“Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien”) as the “kick” tune for everyone to wake up because Marion Cotillard (Mal, Cobb’s dead wife) won an Oscar for playing Piaf in La Vie en Rose.

The headline is slightly unfair, it’s more like “Salander-inspired.” But the irony (or cognitive dissonance) in selling a clothing line based on a character’s fashion tastes in the American movie adaptation (since there already has been a Swedish version of the Millennium Trilogy) of a book that was written by a fairly fervent socialist and attempted stinging critiques of capitalism in the midst of a plot that revolved around some pretty gnarly rape, sexual assault, and exploitation of women (the book’s original Swedish title being Men Who Hate Women) just blows my mind. And this doesn’t even get into the fact that the character Lisbeth Salander is someone who kills and maims — largely to people who’ve wronged and abused her, but it’s not as if she’s anything remotely innocent. “Anti-heroine” is putting it lightly.

TV and film’s almost inured us to these levels of irony and/or dissonance, but there are way too many levels here to ignore without comment.

you NEVER go full retard.
(Tropic Thunder was an average-to-good movie, but boy did it have some good lines.)

you NEVER go full retard.

(Tropic Thunder was an average-to-good movie, but boy did it have some good lines.)

Inconceivable!
(via thehighdefinite.com)

I like watching people fall in love onscreen so much that I can suspend my disbelief in the contrived situations that occur only in the heightened world of romantic comedies. I have come to enjoy the moment when the male lead, say, slips and falls right on top of the expensive wedding cake. I actually feel robbed when the female lead’s dress doesn’t get torn open at a baseball game while the JumboTron camera is on her. I regard romantic comedies as a subgenre of sci-fi, in which the world operates according to different rules than my regular human world. For me, there is no difference between Ripley from “Alien” and any Katherine Heigl character. They are equally implausible. They’re all participating in a similar level of fakey razzle-dazzle, and I enjoy every second of it.

Mindy Kaling: “Flick Chicks” : The New Yorker

The Office writer takes a funny look at the archetypes we’ve either grown used to and/or loathe.

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The Third Shift A vagabond who's made his home in the Pacific Northwest.

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